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How To Check Tire Pressure

Believe it or not, tires can actually lose up to 1psi (pounds per square inch) every month. So be on the safe side and check all tires, including your spare, once a month (or before a long trip). It’s no biggie. Here’s how you do it:

  1. Purchase a trusted pressure gauge.
  2. Check your tires “cold” – before you’ve driven or at least three hours after you’ve driven.
  3. Insert pressure gauge into the valve stem on your tire. (The gauge will “pop” out and show a measured number. When you hear a “pssst” sound, that’s air escaping the tire. The escaping air shouldn’t affect pressure substantially, unless you hold down the air pressure gauge too long.)
  4. Compare the measured psi to the psi found on the sticker inside the driver’s door of your vehicle or in owner’s manual. DO NOT compare to the psi on your tire’s sidewall.
  5. If your psi is above the number, let air out until it matches. If below, add air (or have a BFGoodrich Tires dealer help you) until it reaches the proper number.

For more information, read below. And to find a dealer near you, use the Dealer Locator to your right.

NITROGEN VERSUS COMPRESSED AIR

It’s pretty common knowledge that most tires are filled with compressed air. But some tire dealers have started putting nitrogen in their customers’ tires. (Nitrogen is simply dry air with the oxygen removed. Air contains nearly 79% nitrogen already. Note: Welcome to science class.) Because nitrogen replaces oxygen, less air can escape your tires, and your air pressure stays higher for longer. Also, know that nitrogen and compressed air CAN be mixed, if needed.

Unfortunately, there are other possible sources of leaks (tire/rim interface, valve, valve/rim interface and the wheel), which prevent the guarantee of pressure maintenance for individuals using air or nitrogen inflation. Tires manufactured by BFGoodrich Tires are designed to deliver their expected performance when inflated with air or nitrogen, as long as, the user respects the pressures recommended by the vehicle manufacturer on the vehicle’s placard or by the tire manufacturer.